Budapest Adventures Part I

If I didn’t refrain everyone from touching their food for twenty minutes while I took pictures, then did a Euro trip really happen?

The entire two weeks were a whirlwind so I can’t recall every restaurant we tried (especially since some of the best food we had were street food). Instead, the following posts on Budapest, Vienna and Prague will cover the different ethnic dishes unique to each city with honorable mentions of restaurants/cafes that I thought were particularly memorable. Of course, there are many dishes I have yet to try (guilty: when I get hooked on one thing I like to eat it again and again like it's the last meal I'll ever have), but that’s just more of a reason to visit again in the future.   

meat 

If you’re a meat lover, then welcome to your new favorite place on earth. No matter if it’s filet mignon, ribeye or sirloin steak, Budapest knows its way around the grill. Finding yourself a nice plate of steak should be easy considering every restaurant lists beef as their main course. Fried potato wedges seem to be a popular side, but do beware that most main course meats will lack a portion of veggies; more often than not we had to special order it as a side dish to get our fill. 

 Grilled meat covered in tomato and onion sauce with slices of sausages

Grilled meat covered in tomato and onion sauce with slices of sausages

But don't get me wrong, when I say Budapest knows their meat, I mean every kind. Here we also got to try their grilled chicken and salmon tartare. 

 Tender and juicy, covered in their homemade pesto sauce

Tender and juicy, covered in their homemade pesto sauce

 One of my personal favorites; unlike your traditional salmon tartare, this mixture of salmon and spices was rather thick and its flavoring was light and zesty, which paired along nicely with their homemade slices of multigrain toast and pesto. 

One of my personal favorites; unlike your traditional salmon tartare, this mixture of salmon and spices was rather thick and its flavoring was light and zesty, which paired along nicely with their homemade slices of multigrain toast and pesto. 

goulash 

Goulash (Guláys) is a traditional Hungarian soup made mainly from beef, potatoes and paprika (a spice made from chili pepper). It originated from Hungarian cattlemen and is now known as one of the nation’s most popularly consumed meals. The soup texture is rather thick and is often paired with bread to act as a main dish.  

 This was my aunt's favorite dish; we personally liked the seasoned and thick goulash soups better than the oilier/thin ones. 

This was my aunt's favorite dish; we personally liked the seasoned and thick goulash soups better than the oilier/thin ones. 

KURTOSKALACS

Kürtőskalács (also known as chimney cake) is hands down my favorite Hungarian pastry. Made from sweet yeast dough and wrapped around a cone-shaped skewer, the pastry is painted with melted butter and baked above charcoal until golden and rolled in granulated sugar. Other toppings that can be rolled onto the pastry include almonds, cinnamon, coconut shreds and walnuts.

 Still drool when I think about this

Still drool when I think about this

TOKAJI

Tried, but not featured is the popular Hungarian dessert wine Tokaji. Extremely light and goes down easy for those of you looking for something to pair with your cake after dinner.